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Overcoming I-T Inadequacies and Past Mistakes

2021-07-15

Even *I* am forced by oppressive "I-T professionals" to launch user-handicapping APIs on perfectly good hardware. I believe the useless piece of shit that runs on my work issued desktop is Windows 10 (or some variation thereof). I wouldn't know. I don't do much with it. I have absolutely no use for it. Of course, the first thing I do once the featureless API loads (which strangely takes varying amounts of time) is launch Qemu. And then, I load an operating system on top of the worthless piece of trash. That way, I have a system I can actually control. And then, I can do things like opening an SSH tunnel to my server. And, I can load a Firefox binary stored in the API's user folder. And, I can use the Qemu tunnel as a proxy. This allows me to pipe my internet service from home (instead of relying on my employer's strangely "censored" internet service that denies access to intellectual content).

One of the weirder things the shitty API did recently is add some kind of "weather button" to its taskbar. It stole about one quarter of the available workspace. And (as far as I can tell), it served no clear purpose. I pretty much ignore anything the strange API does. Basically, I use it to launch Qemu. And then, I forget it's there. And, its features are pretty thoughtless and handicapping. But, I sure found this feature annoying. So, I actually went to the trouble of learning how to disable it. I don't want to see what a person in California thinks the weather will be like here in Texas. I found the feature distracting. And, the button was cramping taskbar space unnecessarily.

It was not obvious to me how to disable the piece of shit. I had to waste a good deal of time learning how to do it. In a style typical of Microsoft, names of features and locations of mouse clicks are (probably intentionally) hidden from a user. If you are scratching your head over this dumb feature, the way to get rid of it is to right-click the taskbar. After the useless API decides it's okay to load a menu (that strangely takes a long period of time on my work system), hover on "News and interests" and click "Turn off". Hopefully, this information will save some time you can spend doing actual work. ;)

I can't believe people still use Windows. I figured Android would be running on most systems by now (another user-handicapping API). You would think these old, old, old x86 Intels would be replaced by little Chinese tablets that run on batteries. But (strangely), employers are still wasting money on these high dollar monstrosities. And, they are still running Microsoft's useless software. I guess it makes their I-T guys feel needed. idk. At any rate, I would simply run Limbo on an employer issued Android system (Qemu compiled for the useless "Droid" API). And then, I would be doing (pretty much) the same thing. It's all the same to me. One user-handicapping API is just as useless as another. If you're going to go to the trouble of providing computer systems for employees, please install a GNU/Linux system. That way, a user can control their machine. Nothing else makes sense. If a person is unwilling to use the system, then that sounds like a personal problem to me. Issue him/her a calculator and a spiral notebook, instead.

In case you haven't noticed, I finished revising Hailey's Comet (a project I named "Hailey's Comet (brutally dissected edition)"). You can find it by visiting the Hailey's Follies portal. I made many changes to the story. Mainly, I changed character behaviors that seemed unrealistic to me (and made the book difficult to read). I also repaired some plot holes. And, I went to the trouble of describing what things look like. I felt like a lot of descriptive details were just-- missing. Things that are not important were sometimes described in great detail. In contradiction, other details that are far more interesting (and contribute greatly to the narrative) were not even mentioned. The story was incapable of keeping a reader's interest. It certainly did a poor job of entertaining someone. And, it made very little sense. The "brutally dissected edition" (lol) tells a tale that is believable, colorful, and truly terrifying-- and keeps a reader on the edge of his/her seat. At some point in the future, I will write a nice article for Witty News in which I describe the changes I made in greater detail (and why I chose to make them).

I also finished revising chapter seven of Ghosts of Glory High a few weeks ago. I started writing chapter eight. However, I haven't worked on it much during the past couple of weeks. My girlfriend and her daughter (and their little bunny and stupid, poopid, dumb-dumb, bad, fat cat) came down to see me. :D And so, I've been a little distracted. I'm trying to work the project into my schedule. We'll see how that goes. I also made some (pretty minor) changes to Insanely Witty Stupidity's code (again). See the changelog for details about that. I've been playing around with the Dillo project (a simple, html compliant web browser released under the conditions of the GNU General Public License). I mainly started working with Dillo because I wanted to have a decent web browser for a Slackware-11.0 system I run on top of useless Android devices (using Limbo-x86).

Right away, I found that my website doesn't conform to html standards well enough for Dillo to translate it properly. Initially, I found that none of the site's main icon images loaded (including the IWS smiley on the index page). I finally figured out that an .htaccess file in the images' folder was preventing Dillo from downloading .png files without a user's permission (duh). I also switched "float: left" styles to "inline-block" so that the site's icons (and other things) would present in a row like they are supposed to. Additionally, I spent some time debugging the PHP version of Candice. As it turns out, html br tags were causing hidden inputs to break. None of the other non-ECMA browsers I am familiar with have this problem. If you would like to try out an ancient version of Dillo (like I've been testing), you can find the package I compiled for Slackware-11.0 on Insanely Witty Stupidity's Slackware-11.0 packages portal. You can easily build the project yourself using Slackware-11.0's Slackbuild (available from slackbuilds.org). Until next time, my fellow hackers-- keep on keepin' on.

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html revised 2021-10-27 by Michael Atkins.

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